How THC Works In The Body

 

THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol) is a chemical compound found in cannabis that gives you the feeling of being “high”. There are multiple different strains of cannabis, and each one will give you a different sensation or feeling.

THC has many medical benefits such as: PTSD, Neuropathic and Chronic pain, Insomnia, Nausea, Inflammation, Arthritis, Migraines, Cancer, Crohn’s Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Glaucoma, Alzheimer’s Disease, Fibromyalgia, ADHD, Sleep Apnea, and Appetite loss to name a few.

There are many different ways of taking THC products, like edibles, tinctures, and even topical treatments, however the most common way is to smoke it. Vaporizers heat cannabis to vaporize its active ingredients without burning, which makes an inhalable alternative to smoking. When cannabis is ingested, it enters the stomach and the blood there absorbs it. It then travels to the liver and from there to the rest of the body. THC is absorbed slower this way in comparison to smoking, the levels of THC are lower however the effects last longer. When cannabis is inhaled, it goes directly into your lungs where it is absorbed into your bloodstream which goes to your brain and then to the rest of your body. It is the quickest way to get the THC into your bloodstream.

The purpose of your lungs are to take in oxygen and remove carbon dioxide as a waste product, this process is called “gas exchange”. Lungs are a pair of spongy air filled organs located on either side of your chest or thorax. The windpipe, or trachea, conducts air that has been inhaled into the lungs through it tubular branches called bronchi. The bronchi is divided into smaller and smaller bronchioles that finally become microscopic. The air then travels the the Alveoli. These alveoli line the lungs by the millions, this is where the “gas exchange” happens. The surface area of the alveoli is greater than the skin which makes it easy for THC to enter the bloodstream. Lungs absorb smoke within seconds of it being inhaled.

The brain tells your systems to resist foreign substances, but since cannabinoids have a place in the brains working, it allows them to enter. THC typically reaches the brain seconds after inhalation and begins to work right away. Neurons are the cells that process information in the brain. Chemicals called neurotransmitters allow neurons to communicate with each other, they fill the gap, or synapse between two neurons and bind to protein receptors which allows areas in the body and brain to be turned off. Some neurons have thousands of receptors that are specific to particular neurotransmitters. Chemicals like THC, can copy or block actions of neurotransmitters and interfere with normal functions. Short-term memory, coordination, learning and problem solving are all areas of which your brain’s cannabinoid receptors can affect both physically and mentally. Anandamide are neurotransmitters that activate the cannabinoid receptors. Like THC, anandamide is a cannabinoid, however its one your body makes. THC copy’s actions of the cannabinoid receptors and activates neurons which causes effects on the body and mind

 When THC binds to the receptors, it leads to deep relaxation reducing nerve pain and muscle spasms , reduced pain and inflammation, and boosts your appetite. THC can cause some side effects including sedation, dizziness, dry mouth, short term memory loss and increased heart rate. Anxiety and paranoia are commonly reported however when THC and CBD are consumed together, These side effects are much smaller or not experienced at all.